Home generalSew on the collar - instructions for boy and stand-up collar

Sew on the collar - instructions for boy and stand-up collar

general : Sew on the collar - instructions for boy and stand-up collar

content

  • Material and preparation
  • Sew the collar
    • The stand-up collar
    • The Peter Pan collar
  • Quick guide Stand-up collar
  • Quick Start Puppy collar

Time and again, in the social media, you are confronted with the question of how to give your sewing works something individual. There are countless possibilities here! Even when sewing according to instructions, I can influence much by the choice of materials. Even embellishments such as ribbons and ribbons, appliqués and flounces offer a wealth of options. Another simple twist, the cut something individual to miss, we find the keyword "collar sewing".

I've already sewed a v-neckline for you here and sew this T-shirt neckline two variants with many options. Today I want to deepen the subject of neckline and show two variants of the collar sewing, which somehow never quite get out of fashion: the stand-up collar and the Peter Pan collar. In my example, I sew everything from stretchy materials. For little to no stretchy fabrics, adjustments are still needed in the implementation!

Difficulty level 2/5
(with this guide, even beginners can sew these two collars)

Material costs 1/5
(depending on the fabric selection between 0, - Euro from the remaining utilization and 30, - Euro)

Time expenditure 1/5
(including pattern approx. 45 min - depending on variant and exercise)

Material and preparation

Sew the material to the collar

When sewing a collar, it always makes sense to make it from the remainder of the main fabric. As a special eye-catcher you may want to put an accent and use a different material here . Basically, I would always choose a similar material, that is: If the main fabric is stretchy, the collar should also be stretchable.

Why ">

Because the different patterns are also adapted to the respective fabric types and the head might not fit through the neckline. This problem arises especially when a collar made of non-stretchy fabric, for example, to a Jersey top is sewn. But the other way around, it can be problematic.

In a top made of woven fabric without elasticity, a zipper is most likely sewn in the back center, which of course you must then consider when creating the collar. I show the simplest methods today by sewing everything from stretchy materials.

Sew the amount of material and pattern to the collar

Of course, you also need a top for the respective collar, to which you can sew it on. This requires different amounts of material depending on the cut. But for the collar itself you only need small pieces of fabric or leftovers. In addition, I recommend to reinforce some places with ironing fleece . For stretchy fabrics you should ideally take this fleece line H609 (black) or this fleece line H609 (white). If necessary you are also well advised hereby Vlieseline H180 / 309 (black) or herewith Vlieseline H180 / 309 (white).

Sew the collar

The stand-up collar

For the stand-up collar, adjust your front and back part of the pattern. Now measure the respective length of the neckline.

I sew a children's dress in size 110 - in my case, the front 10.2 cm and 8.9 cm behind.

TIP: Take a flexible tape measure to measure and set it up to get a correct value for rounding.

For the pattern I draw on a blank sheet of paper on the left side a vertical line - this is my rear center (HM), my Stoffbruch. At right angles, I draw a straight line.

INFO: I used checkered paper, but you can also use smooth paper without lines or pattern paper.

First I measure - from the HM away - the length of the rear section and put me a mark. At this point is later the shoulder seam.

Starting from this point, I measure my front length.

For the next step we need the collar height . For adults mostly 3 - 4 cm are taken here. Since I am sewing for a child and the collar should remain discreet, I have decided for 2.5 cm. So I draw again at right angles to the material break a parallel line to my measurements with a distance of 2.5 cm.

So that the collar later stands up nicely and does not wrinkle, we now have to consider the rounding of the neck. For this I measure from my upper line 1 cm down.

Starting from this point, I now draw freehand a bow to my upper line, which measures about as long as a third of the front collar neckline.

TIP: For adults this bow can be drawn up to two thirds running.

From this point on, I now draw a right angle.

Of course, the collar height is maintained here, so I measure 2.5 cm.

Then I lead a bow here too, but this time to the lower line, which runs as parallel as possible to the upper arc.

TIP: The curve is especially nice with a curve ruler, but you can draw freehand without any hesitation.

When cutting, please keep in mind that you will later need about 1 cm seam allowance all around.

First, you can cut out the pattern.

So far it is done. However, I would like to have rounded corners at the front, where the two ends meet, so I draw a curve and cut the pattern accordingly.

Now the cutting takes place. As already mentioned, with 1 cm seam allowance in double fabric layer, because I have to put the back center on the material break.

TIP: For particularly thin, light or soft materials, one or both cut pieces should now be reinforced with the previously recommended non-woven fabric.

So that everything fits together correctly when plugged together, I now mark my important "meeting points" by means of a few incisions, ie places where the various substances should meet.

The first is the shoulder seam (between front and back measurements), followed by the back center.

I put the two collar parts right to right (ie with the "nice" sides together) on each other.

Sewn is now the right side including the curves.

If you are unsure, put the two pieces together before sewing so that nothing slips.

TIP: For this seam you can exceptionally use a straight stitch despite the stretchy material, as it will be especially beautiful. This seam is usually exposed during stretching of the dress no strain and therefore should not be able to tear.

Then I cut several times at the curves to the seam, so that the fabric can lay well after turning.

In addition, it is advisable to cut back the seam allowance at these points. Then the collar is turned and ironed well.

In my children's dress, I have already sewn the shoulder seams and marked me the front and the back center by means of small incisions.

Now I put the collar from the outside on the neckline, starting at the back center.

The following marks should now be on top of each other.

The back center of the dress under the back center of the collar. The shoulder seams with the markings of the shoulder seams. The front center with the two front collar ends. In the same way everything will be stitched together.

TIP: I like to put, which should be exactly, like with the "normal" sewing machine. Because I also like to have it "clean", I then sew again with the overlock.

Now the collar only has to be flipped up and ironed, then you are done sewing with the collar.

Optionally, it can be quilted again. And already the stand-up collar is ready!

The Peter Pan collar

For the Peter Pan collar, you also need additional receipts and thus more cutting parts in total. In total, however, the pattern is already finished and only needs to be extended. Much easier to sew than the stand-up collar.

First, I draw the cutout on the pattern paper from the front part and the back part.

It's just a few inches high. Here I now draw parallel to the neckline each a bow in 4 cm distance.

These two cut pieces (once for the front, once for the back) I cut out and my vouchers are ready. The documents are each cut in the material break. The seam allowance is about 1 cm on all three sides.

TIP: For thinner fabrics and also for those who like to curl up, should be strengthened again with non-woven fabric.

For the Peter Pan collar, I now glue together the two document parts on the shoulder seam (the designations for the material break - SB - lie at the ends).

I mark this pattern and add a rounding on the front.

Then my collar pattern is already finished and I can cut it out. The collar is cut twice, the outer part I would additionally reinforce with non-woven fabric so that it rests nicely.

The two parts are now stacked right to right (ie with the "nice" sides together).

Sewn is now - as with the stand-up collar - the right side including the curves. If you are unsure, put the two pieces together before sewing so that nothing slips.

TIP: For this seam you can exceptionally use a straight stitch despite the stretchy material, as it will be especially beautiful. This seam is usually exposed during stretching of the dress no strain and therefore should not be able to tear.

Then I cut several times at the curves to the seam, so that the fabric can lay well after turning.

In addition, it is advisable to cut back the seam allowance at these points.

I sit down through small incisions markings on the shoulder seams and the back center.

Then the collar is turned and ironed well.

TIP: So that nothing slips together when sewing together and the collar in the middle meets exactly, I sew the two ends together by hand with a few stitches. Sew together here, at least in the area of ​​the seam allowance, better something beyond. If you also like to use yarn in a contrasting color, it will be better to see it later when you remove it.

I sew the two parts together only at the shoulder seams.

Then I iron out the seam allowances and for a nice, clean finish I sew again with the overlock on the outside and iron this seam.

In my children's dress I now also close the shoulder seams and iron the seam allowances apart.

In addition, I also mark here the front and the back center. Now I put the collar from the outside on the neckline, and as it should already be on the finished dress. If both collar parts are made of the same material, I would sew that part with the ironing fleece on the outside. I start again at the back center. The following marks should now be on top of each other.

The back center of the dress under the back center of the collar. The shoulder seams with the markings of the shoulder seams. The front center with the two front collar ends. Now I lay the document over it and pay attention to the fact that all markings, the "meeting points" are exactly superimposed.

In the same way everything will be stitched together.

TIP: I like to put, which should be exactly, like with the "normal" sewing machine. Because I also like to have it "clean", I then sew again with the overlock.

Now, the document only has to be folded inwards and everything ironed, then you are done sewing with the collar. Optionally, it can be quilted again. But I would fold up the collar part and sew only the clothing material underneath with the slip.

And already the Peter Pan collar is ready!

Quick guide Stand-up collar

01. Make pattern according to instructions.
02. Cut collar part 2x in break.
03. Merge right to right and stitch together the page with the bows.
04. Cut curves in the NZ - shorten optional.
05. Turn and iron.
06. Put the collar on the markings on the neckline, sew on.
07. And done!

Quick Start Puppy collar

01. Make receipts and patterns according to instructions.
02. Cut collar part 2x. Strengthen outer part.
03. If necessary reinforce documents and sew together at the shoulders.
04. Overcast possibly document part.
05. Sew the collar together by hand - at least NZ!
06. Put the collar on the markings on the neckline.
07. slip the document over the collar and also stuck, sew everything together.
08. Ironing and optional under the collar just topstitch the main fabric and the document.
09. And done!

The twisted pirate

$config[ads_kvadrat] not found
Category:
Tinker Birthday Party Invitations - 7 ideas
Sticking Styrofoam Sheets: DIY Guide | Glue for Styrofoam